Democracy and election

Here you can read about elections and referenda in Denmark as well as the government of Denmark as a representative democracy.

Denmark is a representative democracy where the most important decisions are made by elected politicians in the Danish parliament, the regional councils or the local councils.

 

 

Denmark is a representative democracy. On election day, voters elect the representatives they want to look after their interests in the Danish parliament, Folketinget, regional councils and town and city councils

General elections

The 179-seat Danish parliament is made up of politicians from a number of political parties. The party or parties supported by a parliamentary majority form(s) the government, which is headed by the prime minister.

Parliamentary elections are held at least every four years, but the prime minister can call an election earlier if he or she so wishes. This is how general elections are usually called.

Who can vote?

Any person who has attained the age of 18 years, is a national of Denmark and resident in the Kingdom is eligible to vote in a general election. People under guardianship who have been deprived of legal capacity, however, are ineligible to vote

Municipal and regional elections

The five regions and 98 municipalities are run by regional, local or town councils.

Municipal and regional elections also take place every four years, but this always happens on a fixed date, the third Tuesday in November. However, it is not possible to call regional or municipal elections in the middle of an election period.

The next municipal and regional election will be in November 2017.

Who can vote?

Any person who has attained the age of 18 years and is resident in the local authority area is eligible to vote in the election to local and regional councils. However, people who are not nationals of Denmark, another EU Member State, Iceland or Norway may only vote if they have resided in the Kingdom for a period of three years prior to the election. People under guardianship who have been deprived of legal capacity (previously known as “incapacitated adults”), however, are ineligible to vote.

Everyone who is entitled to vote is also eligible for election and can thus run for regional or municipal elections.